Posts Tagged ‘Social Media Campaign’

David Mullen, in the latest of his daily dose of insight, has opened up the discussion on yet another important topic for many of us experimenting with social media and developing campaigns for clients who are more than a little bit skeptical about venturing into a territory with which they are, for the most part, lost.

I strongly urge you to read Mr Mullen’s post – Should Brands Approach Social Media with a “Pilot Program” Mindset?

There are arguments to both sides of the issue. A “Pilot Program” helps ease the client into this scary and unfamiliar terrain. The downside is that you may not see results or ROI if you don’t commit to a thought-out, long term, strategy. Kind of a catch 22. There is, IMHO, a middle ground. A way to create a small scale, but comprehensive social media attack. The key is to develop a strategy that can be narrowly focused, initially, and then expanded and expounded upon, both in terms of goals and means to achieve those goals, as the data from the first phase can be analysed. Those metrics will provide feedback for you as you grow the initiative from a fine, targeted, endeavor, to a more far reaching and all-encompassing social media presence, and with it, your own unique approach and attitude.

I think it’s more about choosing the right channel – Pick one vehicle – facebook, youtube, twitter, a blog, etc…and focus all efforts on that one medium. This way, you’ve got your pilot program mentality in that you’re not trying to tackle the entire social space in one fell swoop. It’s not overwhelming; you have time to manage and monitor one platform, and thus you can develop a system in which consistancy is maintained.

Additionally, Choosing one medium allows for much easier measurement and analytics, to determine if the effort has delivered and if it’s worthwhile to expand.

Of course, to do this, you also have to Define your primary goal – customer service, marketing, branding, PR…etc. – pick one & stick to it – let your goal be the guiding influence in choosing the most effective social platform and your method for measuring results.

This is my “Pilot Program.” It has longevity, a goal, consistency, and it’s measurable. If it’s deemed to be successful, you can adapt this mini-initiative to other social media, or expand your goals, if desired. Either way, limiting yourself or your brand to 1 goal, 1 platform, 1 campaign is the best, IMHO, form of Pilot Program – insofar as that it has all the elements of a traditional and comprehensive campaign, while keeping things simple enough to act as a test of your needs, capabilities, and suitability for the effectively utilizing these media.

What do you think? Remember – My Blog is Your Blog – Share Your Thoughts!

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Last Week, David Mullin Posted a Great Article “We’re Setting Up Young PR Pros for Failure.”

Today, Meg Roberts Posted a Follow Up Piece “Are We Forcing Social Media Tunnel Vision on Young PR Pros?”

In it, she wonders”

“are young PR professionals being set up for failure because they aren’t being given enough opportunities to investigate and learn traditional tactics and strategies?

As companies continue to look at younger staff members for social media expertise, senior employees, recent graduates, and interns should work together to ensure young professionals have well-rounded task lists that include a variety of skills necessary for communication campaigns – both online and offline.”

I think she’s really hit the nail on the head. I’ve heard many stories, including my own, of young PR pros who have become the de facto social media experts at their firms, purely predicated on age.

Personally, I’ve embraced this role, as I’m passionate about social media and I do have a background in traditional PR as well, so I don’t feel as if I’m missing out on crucial work experience (yet). But this isn’t usually the case and I fear that she is correct – people in our generation are almost obligated to focus on social media, precluding them the necessary experience of traditional PR and media relations.

Not only that, but despite the popularity of social media and digital campaign, the actual ROI of social media is still very much disputed, and if things continue to move in this direction, we may very well be setting ourselves up, not just for failure, but for lesser value in the workforce.

I think this is indicative of a larger problem as well – the idea that social media campaigns are inherently, or should be, independent entities, intentionally disparate from traditional media endeavors. This is a MAJOR problem IMHO. I won’t knock Social Media, I can’t seeing as it’s probably my future and is my passion. However, even the best social/digital strategy must be integrated into a larger PR or Marketing approach. SM on it’s own can only do so much and go so far. Traditional marketing & PR tactics must be used in congruence with an online approach in order to capitalize on any successful social engagement on behalf of the brand or company.

These problems are intertwined. Social Media isn’t something that one person should be tasked with, nor is it a campaign in and of itself. A firm, properly employing social/digital strategy, would do so by training all employees to complement their traditional PR/Marketing with the added benefits of social media outreach…something that many are hesitant to accept.

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In Keeping With Tradition – Here Are My Recommended Posts & Articles for This Week (So Far). Enjoy! And Feel Free To Suggest Others in the Comments!

The Most Interesting Man in the World: How to Blend Traditional, Online and Social Media Tactics Into One Cohesive Campaign (Identity PR)

Avoid Twitter Disasters (PC Mag)

The Day Facebook Changed Forever: Messages to Become Public By Default (Read Write Web)

Dear People Who Game Twitter For Followers: It’s Over (Tremendous News)

Did Habitat Use Iran Conflict to Attract Twitterers? (AdAge)

Tim Burton’s Beautiful Reboot of ‘Alice in Wonderland’ (Fast Company)

Blogging: the long and short of it (Guardian)

10 Twitter Best Practices for Brands (Mashable)

Chris Anderson, Elizabeth Hasselbeck Both Accused of Plagiarism (BNET)

Retweeting: ‘Followers’ look to ‘leaders’ as social networks grow (CNN)

5 tips for brand marketing on Twitter (Freshbooks)

A Shameless Defense of Journalism (New York Times)

When Does a Social Media Policy Go Too Far? Ask the Associated Press (Mashable)

The Best Kept Secret of Facebook Fan Pages (Social Media Today)

Social Media Advertising: Does It Work… or Doesn’t It? (Marketing Profs)

Is augmented reality a mobile killer app? (eConsultancy)

When Consumers Help, Ads Are Free (New York Times)

Web TV You’ll Need to Pay to See: Time Warner, Comcast Roll Out “Authentication.” Who Else Is In? (All Things Digital)

Facebook movie pinning down director, cast (CNET)

Arrested Development Movie – Examiner.com

What Bing, Twitter, and Facebook Mean for SEO (WebProNews)

Wired editor mired in controversy over parallels between book and Wikipedia (Guardian)

Dear Fast Feeders, Please Keep Your Meat Away From the Ladies (AdAge) [2 Girls 1 Sub All Over Again!]

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